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How to stop Windows 10 auto updates. Windows 10 software updates install on your device automatically (whether you like it or not), but this guide can help you retake control and decide when to install them.

On Windows 10, you no longer have absolute control over software updates. They’re mandatory, and they download and install automatically to ensure your device stays up to date with the latest security patches and improvements. This approach is convenient for many users, but it’s not one that everyone wants.

If you’re running Windows 10 Pro or higher, it’s possible to retake control and prevent the OS from downloading and installing updates automatically using the Local Group Policy Editor or the Registry.

In this Windows 10 guide, we’ll walk you through the steps to prevent updates from automatically installing on your computer.

How to prevent automatic updates using the Local Group Policy Editor

If you run Windows 10 (Professional, Enterprise, or Education ), you can use the Local Group Policy Editor to quickly change the settings to prevent Windows 10 from automatically downloading and installing updates.

Here’s how to change the Local Group Policy Editor settings:

  1. Use the Windows key + R keyboard shortcut to open the Run command.
  2. Type gpedit.msc and click OK to open the Local Group Policy Editor.
  3. Browse the following path:Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Update
  4. On the right side, double-click the Configure Automatic Updates policy.
  5. On the left side, check the Enabled option to enable the policy.
  6. Under Options, you’ll find a number of ways to configure automatic updates, including:
    • 2 – “Notify for download and notify for install.”
    • 3 – “Auto download and notify for install.”
    • 4 – “Auto download and schedule the install.”
    • 5 – “Allow local admin to choose setting.”

    You should select the update option you want to configure. If you select option 4, you can specify exactly when to install new updates. You can also choose to install updates during automatic maintenance, on a particular day and time, and you can even check the option to include other Microsoft product updates when updating the OS.

  7. Click Apply.
  8. Click OK to complete the task.

While you can pick from any of the available options, your best choice is probably 2 – Notify for download and notify for install. This option will not only prevent the OS from downloading updates automatically, which can save you data when using a metered internet connection, but you’ll get a notification when new updates are available.

When new updates are released, you’ll receive a notification in Action Center, but updates won’t download and install until you’re ready and do the following:

  1. Open Settings.
  2. Click on Update & security.
  3. Click on Windows Update.
  4. Click the Download button.
  5. Click the Restart button to complete the task.

How to prevent automatic updates using the Registry

Instead of using the Local Group Policy Editor, you can also change the Windows 10 updates using the Registry.

Important warning: Editing the registry is risky, and it can cause irreversible damage to your installation if you don’t do it correctly. It’s recommended that you make a full backup of your computer before proceeding.

  1. Use the Windows key + R keyboard shortcut to open the Run command.
  2. Type regedit, and click OK to open the Registry.
  3. Browse the following path:HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows
  4. Right-click the Windows (folder) key, select New, and then click Key.
  5. Name the new key WindowsUpdate and press Enter.
  6. Right-click the newly created key, select new, and click Key.
  7. Name the new key AU and press Enter.
  8. Inside the newly created key, right-click on the right side, select New, and click on DWORD (32-bit) Value.
  9. Name the new key AUOptions and press Enter.
  10. Double-click the newly created key and change its value using one of the following options:
    • 2 – “Notify for download and notify for install.”
    • 3 – “Auto download and notify for install.”
    • 4 – “Auto download and schedule the install.”
    • 5 – “Allow local admin to choose settings.”

  11. Click OK.
  12. Close the Registry to complete the task.

Although you can use any of these available values, your best choice is to change the value to 2 to configure the “Notify for download and notify for install” option. Using this value prevents Windows 10 from downloading updates automatically, and you’ll get a notification when new updates are available.

After tweaking the Registry, when new updates become available, you’ll receive a notification in Action Center, but updates won’t download and install until you’re ready and do the following:

  1. Open Settings.
  2. Click on Update & security.
  3. Click on Windows Update.
  4. Click the Download button.
  5. Click the Restart button to complete the task.

Wrapping things up

The steps mentioned in this guide are meant to prevent regular updates that patch security vulnerabilities and improve the overall performance of Windows 10. If you’re looking to prevent the OS from installing feature updates, such as the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update, you need to use this guide to defer major updates.

We do not recommend using a computer without the latest updates, because they’re often key to keeping your Windows 10 PC running properly. However, there will be times when you may want to manually apply new updates, when you want to install them during a particular time, or because you want to wait until you’re sure the update will not cause issues.

If you only want to prevent your computer from restarting when you’re actively using it you can configure Active Hours in the Settings app.

More Windows 10 resources

For more help articles, coverage and common questions about Windows 10, check out the following resources:

OR

Stop The Windows Update Service

As central as it is to the core of Windows 10, Windows Update is actually just another Windows process so it can be stopped with these simple steps:

    1. Open the Run command (Win + R), in it type: services.msc and press enter
    2. From the Services list which appears find the Windows Update service and open it
  1. In ‘Startup Type’ (under the ‘General’ tab) change it to ‘Disabled’
  2. Restart

To re-enable Windows Update simply repeat these four steps, but change the Startup Type to ‘Automatic’

Source: https://www.windowscentral.com/how-stop-updates-installing-automatically-windows-10

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Pause/Resume ANY Task in Windows 10 and older

Resource Monitor is an highly useful tool built-in to Windows to monitor the various resource (CPU, Disk) usage of PC. It’s overshadowed by another similar and commonly known tool, Task Manager although some of its features are superior to the latter.

Here’s how you can pause/resume a running task in Windows –

  1. Open up Resource Monitor. You can search for it in the Start or call it by its pet name resmon through Run command (Windows+R) tool. 
  2. Now in the Overview or CPU tab, look for process you want to Pause in the list of running Processes. Image name may be different than the application name. To easily locate your application, look the Description column which will have the application name
  3. Once the process is located, right click on it and select Suspend Process and confirm the Suspension in the next dialog.

Now you have successfully suspended the process or in other words, paused it. It will remain in that state until you Resume it by Right click > Resume process. A process in paused state won’t run and will not use CPU. However, it does consume the same amount of memory as it was at the time of suspension. Paused application will be freezed and you can’t click or do anything with it until you resume it. This works for all applications.Note that this paused state is dynamic. It won’t be retained if the PC is shutdown. As an alternate, you can hibernate the PC in which case, everything will stay as it is.

This trick proves very useful for CPU intensive tasks like video encoding or any other applications which do not come with a Pause option. And before I forget, do not try this trick with any of the Windows processes which can potentially mess up your system.

Epilogue:

The other day, I was encoding a video in HandBrake. Fast-forward an hour, the CPU was so close to becoming nothing more than a roasted chip and there was nothing(almost) I could do about it other than changing the encoding priority (which didn’t help much). And Handbrake doesn’t have a pause button (so much for the popularity). The Stop button looked as if it was mocking at me because pressing it would mean all my hours of effort would go down the drain(if you ever encoded a video, you know what I’m talking about).I was pondering about a quick solution and there came the mighty Resource Monitor to rescue.

Update: HandBrake now finally has a Pause/Resume button(starting from version 1.0.0). If you don’t see it, update HandBrake to the latest version. You can stiil use the trick below though –

If you want to pause encoding task on Handbrake, suspend the process named HandbrakeCLI.exeNOT Handbrake.exeYou can then see the the progress bar stuck at the same level in HandBrake’s main window which will confirm your action. To resume encoding, just Resume the same process suspended earlier.

Source: https://windroidwiz.wordpress.com/2016/07/30/trickpauseresume-any-task-in-windows/

Free DNS providers

Google 8.8.8.8: Private and unfiltered. Most popular option.
CloudFlare 1.1.1.1: Private and unfiltered. New player.
Quad9 9.9.9.9: Private and security aware. New player that blocks access to malicious domains.
OpenDNS 208.67.222.222: Old player that blocks malicious domains and offers the option to block adult content.
Norton DNS 199.85.126.20: Old player that blocks malicious domains and is integrated with their Antivirus.
CleanBrowsing 185.228.168.168: Private and security aware. New player that blocks access to adult content.
Yandex DNS 77.88.8.7: Old player that blocks malicious domains. Very popular in Russia.
Comodo DNS 8.26.56.26: Old player that blocks malicious domains.

Proxmox Free Community upgrade from 4.4 to 5.x version

01. /etc/apt/sources.list
deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian jessie main contrib

# PVE pve-no-subscription repository provided by proxmox.com,
# NOT recommended for production use
deb http://download.proxmox.com/debian jessie pve-no-subscription

# security updates
deb http://security.debian.org jessie/updates main contrib

02. mv /etc/apt/sources.list.d/pve-enterprise.list /home

03. apt-get update

04. apt-get dist-upgrade

05. reboot

06. Virtual Environment 4.4-18/ef2610e8

07. /etc/apt/sources.list
deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian stretch main contrib

# PVE pve-no-subscription repository provided by proxmox.com,
# NOT recommended for production use
deb http://download.proxmox.com/debian/pve stretch pve-no-subscription

# security updates
deb http://security.debian.org stretch/updates main contrib

08. apt-get update

09. apt-get dist-upgrade

10. reboot

11. Virtual Environment 5.0-32/2560e073

Soure: https://forum.proxmox.com/threads/test-upgrade-from-community-4-4-to-5-x.37232/

How to migrate a Windows PC to a Parallels Desktop virtual machine

Symptoms

You have a Windows PC, and you want to migrate it, along with all its content, to a Parallels Desktop for Mac virtual machine.

Resolution

You can import all your data from a Windows PC to Parallels Desktop on your Mac. Then you can continue to work with all your Windows programs, files, and data side-by-side with OS X.

Important: After importing your data from your PC, you may need to reactivate some of your Windows programs using the activation keys you received when you purchased the programs.


Note: After migration is complete your PC will remain unmodified. See related article KB 117639


Requirements for importing your data

To import data to your Mac, you need a Windows computer with the following specifications:

For Parallels Transported Agent v.9:

  • Windows XP with Service Pack 2 or later, Windows Vista, Windows 7 or Windows 8.

    Note: You can also use a computer running Windows Server 2008 R2 (64-bit only), Windows Server 2008, or Windows 2000 Professional (32-bit only).

  • An Intel or AMD (700 MHz or higher) x86 or x64 processor
  • At least 256 MB of RAM
  • At least 70 MB of hard disk space for installing Parallels Transporter Agent
  • One of the following:
    • An Ethernet port for transferring your data over the network
    • A USB port for transferring your data using the Parallels USB cable
  • An external storage device, such as a USB hard disk
  • Supported Windows and Linux versions:**
    • Windows 8.1
    • Windows 7
    • Windows Vista
    • Windows XP
    • Windows Server 2003
    • Windows 2000
    • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.x, 6.x
    • Ubuntu Linux 10.04 LTS, 14.04

For Parallels Transporter Agent v.10

See the Parallels Transporter Agent User’s Guide)

  • 700 MHz (or higher) x86 or x64 processor (Intel or AMD)
  • 256 MB or more of RAM
  • 50 MB of hard disk space for installing Parallels Transporter Agent
  • Ethernet or WiFi network adapter for migrating over network
  • Supported Windows and Linux versions:
    • Windows 8.1
    • Windows 7
    • Windows Vista
    • Windows XP
    • Windows Server 2003
    • Windows 2000
    • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.x, 6.x
    • Ubuntu Linux 10.04 LTS, 14.04

Note: Parallels Desktop does not support migrating Windows dynamic volumes (in which size is not fixed, as it is in basic volumes). They are migrated as data disks only. You can add them later to an existing virtual machine.

Also read KB #119172 before proceeding with migration.

Step 1: Install Parallels Transporter Agent on your Windows PC

To import your data, you must first install the Parallels Transporter Agent software on the Windows PC.

Do one of the following:

  • If you purchased a physical copy of Parallels Desktop, insert the installation DVD into your Windows PC. If the installation doesn’t start automatically, locate and double-click the Parallels Transporter Agent.exe file.
  • Download Parallels Transporter Agent for Windows from the Parallels website and double-click the installation file.

If your computer is connected to the Internet, Parallels Transporter Agent checks for available updates. If an update is available, click Download and Install New Version. Follow the onscreen instructions to install Parallels Transporter Agent.

Step 2: Import Your Data

Choose one of the methods below for importing your data from your PC to your Mac.

Using a Parallels USB cable

The Parallels USB cable required for this method is included with Parallels Desktop Switch to Mac Edition. If you don’t have the Parallels USB cable, import your data using one of the other methods.


Note: Parallels USB Cable is available only for Parallels Desktop 8 Switch to Mac Edition and earlier.


  1. Turn on your Mac and your Windows PC then log in to both computers.
  2. On the Windows PC, open Parallels Transporter Agent by clicking the Start menu and selecting All Programs > Parallels > Parallels Transporter Agent.
  3. Connect the Parallels USB cable to your Windows PC and your Mac.
  4. If the Windows PC is running Windows XP, the Found New Hardware wizard opens. In this wizard:
    • Select Yes, this time only, and click Next.
    • Select Install the software automatically (Recommended), and click Next.
    • A Hardware Installation warning appears. Click Continue Anyway.
    • Drivers for the Parallels USB cable are installed. Click Finish to exit the wizard.
  5. On your Mac, open Parallels Desktop and choose File > New.
  6. Select Migrate from a PC and click Continue.
  7. Select Parallels USB cable and click Continue. Parallels Transporter will start collecting information about the source computer.
  8. If the Windows Installation Files window appears, insert the Windows installation disc into your Mac and click Continue.
  9. If you don’t want to log in to Windows automatically whenever you start up, select “Do not enable Automatic Logon”. Then click Continue.
  10. Choose whether you want to migrate all your files and data or only Windows applications. Then click Continue.
  11. Choose where you want to install your data. You can also click Customize and select which Windows volumes to migrate. Then click Continue.
  12. In the next step you will see a warning about Windows activation that might be required when you start using it. To proceed, read this message, select I want to continue and click Continue.
  13. Once the migration is complete, click Done.
  14. Start Windows.
  15. Once Windows starts up, choose Virtual Machine > Install Parallels Tools and follow the onscreen instructions.

Note: To be able to install Parallels Tools, you must be logged in to Windows as an administrator.

Over a network

Important: After importing your data, you may need to reactivate some of your Windows programs using the activation keys you received when you purchased the programs. To import your data from a PC over a network:

  1. Turn on your Mac and your Windows PC then log in to both. Verify sure that the computers are connected over the same network.
  2. Make sure that the Windows firewall is turned off. You can turn it on again after the import is finished.
  3. On the Windows PC, open Parallels Transporter Agent. From the Start menu select All Programs > Parallels > Parallels Transporter Agent.
  4. On your Mac, open Parallels Desktop and choose File > New.
  5. Select “Migrate from a PC” and click Continue.
  6. Select “Network” and click Continue.
  7. Find the passcode displayed in Parallels Wizard on your Mac and enter it in Parallels Transporter Agent on your Windows PC. You can also connect to the source Windows PC using its name or IP address: click “Use IP address instead”, select the Windows PC name from the list or type the IP address, and click Continue.
  8. If you have chosen to use the computer name or IP address, provide the Windows administrator credentials. Parallels Desktop will connect to Parallels Transporter Agent and start collecting information about the source computer.
  9. If the Windows Installation Files window appears, insert the Windows installation disc into your Mac and click Continue.
  10. If you don’t want to log in to Windows automatically whenever you start up, select “Do not enable Automatic Logon”. Then click Continue.
  11. Choose whether you want to migrate all your files and data or only Windows applications. Then click Continue.
  12. Choose where you want to install your data. You can also click Customize and select which Windows volumes to migrate. Then click Continue.
  13. In the next step you will see a warning about Windows activation that might be required when you start using it. To proceed, read this message, select “I want to continue” and click Continue.
  14. Once the migration is complete, click Done.
  15. Start Windows.
  16. When Windows boots up, choose Virtual Machine > Install Parallels Tools and follow the onscreen instructions.

Note: To be able to install Parallels Tools, you must be logged in to Windows as an administrator.

Using an External Storage Device

Important: After importing your data, you may need to reactivate some of your Windows programs using the activation keys you received when you purchased the programs. To import your data from a PC using an external storage device:

  1. Connect an external storage device to your Windows PC.
  2. In the Windows PC, open Parallels Transporter Agent by clicking the Start menu and selecting All Programs > Parallels > Parallels Transporter Agent.
  3. Click the external storage device icon.
  4. Click Next. Parallels Transporter Agent will collect information about the Windows PC.
  5. If you don’t want to log in to Windows automatically whenever you start up, select “Do not enable Automatic Logon”. Then click Next.
  6. Choose whether you want to migrate all your files and data or only Windows applications. Then click Next.
  7. Choose where you want to store your data. You can also click Customize and select which Windows volumes to migrate. Then click Next.
  8. In the next step you will see a warning about Windows activation that might be required when you start using it. To proceed, read this message, select “I want to continue” and click Next.
  9. Once the migration is complete, click Done to quit Parallels Transporter Agent.
  10. Disconnect the storage device from the Windows PC and connect it to your Mac.
  11. On your Mac, open Parallels Desktop and choose File > New.
  12. Select “Migrate from a PC” and click Continue.
  13. Select “External Storage Device” and click Continue.
  14. Click “Choose” and locate where you chose to store your data in step 7. Then click Continue.
  15. Choose where you want to install Windows and your data, then click Continue.
  16. Once the migration is complete, click Done.
  17. Start Windows.
  18. When Windows boots up, choose Virtual Machine > Install Parallels Tools and follow the onscreen instructions.

Note: To be able to install Parallels Tools, you must be logged in to Windows as an administrator.

For more information about migrating your PC to Mac please also visit our on-line User’s Guide

If you have an issue with migration, please follow the solution outlined in KB #113269.


Related articles:

Source: http://kb.parallels.com/eu/115007

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