PFsense 2.4.3 There were error(s) loading the rules: /tmp/rules.debug:18: cannot define table bogonsv6: Cannot allocate memory – The line in question read

Increase the Firewall Maximum Table Entries size to 400000 in System > Advanced, Firewall & NAT

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Proxmox Free Community upgrade from 4.4 to 5.x version

01. /etc/apt/sources.list
deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian jessie main contrib

# PVE pve-no-subscription repository provided by proxmox.com,
# NOT recommended for production use
deb http://download.proxmox.com/debian jessie pve-no-subscription

# security updates
deb http://security.debian.org jessie/updates main contrib

02. mv /etc/apt/sources.list.d/pve-enterprise.list /home

03. apt-get update

04. apt-get dist-upgrade

05. reboot

06. Virtual Environment 4.4-18/ef2610e8

07. /etc/apt/sources.list
deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian stretch main contrib

# PVE pve-no-subscription repository provided by proxmox.com,
# NOT recommended for production use
deb http://download.proxmox.com/debian/pve stretch pve-no-subscription

# security updates
deb http://security.debian.org stretch/updates main contrib

08. apt-get update

09. apt-get dist-upgrade

10. reboot

11. Virtual Environment 5.0-32/2560e073

Soure: https://forum.proxmox.com/threads/test-upgrade-from-community-4-4-to-5-x.37232/

How to migrate a Windows PC to a Parallels Desktop virtual machine

Symptoms

You have a Windows PC, and you want to migrate it, along with all its content, to a Parallels Desktop for Mac virtual machine.

Resolution

You can import all your data from a Windows PC to Parallels Desktop on your Mac. Then you can continue to work with all your Windows programs, files, and data side-by-side with OS X.

Important: After importing your data from your PC, you may need to reactivate some of your Windows programs using the activation keys you received when you purchased the programs.


Note: After migration is complete your PC will remain unmodified. See related article KB 117639


Requirements for importing your data

To import data to your Mac, you need a Windows computer with the following specifications:

For Parallels Transported Agent v.9:

  • Windows XP with Service Pack 2 or later, Windows Vista, Windows 7 or Windows 8.

    Note: You can also use a computer running Windows Server 2008 R2 (64-bit only), Windows Server 2008, or Windows 2000 Professional (32-bit only).

  • An Intel or AMD (700 MHz or higher) x86 or x64 processor
  • At least 256 MB of RAM
  • At least 70 MB of hard disk space for installing Parallels Transporter Agent
  • One of the following:
    • An Ethernet port for transferring your data over the network
    • A USB port for transferring your data using the Parallels USB cable
  • An external storage device, such as a USB hard disk
  • Supported Windows and Linux versions:**
    • Windows 8.1
    • Windows 7
    • Windows Vista
    • Windows XP
    • Windows Server 2003
    • Windows 2000
    • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.x, 6.x
    • Ubuntu Linux 10.04 LTS, 14.04

For Parallels Transporter Agent v.10

See the Parallels Transporter Agent User’s Guide)

  • 700 MHz (or higher) x86 or x64 processor (Intel or AMD)
  • 256 MB or more of RAM
  • 50 MB of hard disk space for installing Parallels Transporter Agent
  • Ethernet or WiFi network adapter for migrating over network
  • Supported Windows and Linux versions:
    • Windows 8.1
    • Windows 7
    • Windows Vista
    • Windows XP
    • Windows Server 2003
    • Windows 2000
    • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.x, 6.x
    • Ubuntu Linux 10.04 LTS, 14.04

Note: Parallels Desktop does not support migrating Windows dynamic volumes (in which size is not fixed, as it is in basic volumes). They are migrated as data disks only. You can add them later to an existing virtual machine.

Also read KB #119172 before proceeding with migration.

Step 1: Install Parallels Transporter Agent on your Windows PC

To import your data, you must first install the Parallels Transporter Agent software on the Windows PC.

Do one of the following:

  • If you purchased a physical copy of Parallels Desktop, insert the installation DVD into your Windows PC. If the installation doesn’t start automatically, locate and double-click the Parallels Transporter Agent.exe file.
  • Download Parallels Transporter Agent for Windows from the Parallels website and double-click the installation file.

If your computer is connected to the Internet, Parallels Transporter Agent checks for available updates. If an update is available, click Download and Install New Version. Follow the onscreen instructions to install Parallels Transporter Agent.

Step 2: Import Your Data

Choose one of the methods below for importing your data from your PC to your Mac.

Using a Parallels USB cable

The Parallels USB cable required for this method is included with Parallels Desktop Switch to Mac Edition. If you don’t have the Parallels USB cable, import your data using one of the other methods.


Note: Parallels USB Cable is available only for Parallels Desktop 8 Switch to Mac Edition and earlier.


  1. Turn on your Mac and your Windows PC then log in to both computers.
  2. On the Windows PC, open Parallels Transporter Agent by clicking the Start menu and selecting All Programs > Parallels > Parallels Transporter Agent.
  3. Connect the Parallels USB cable to your Windows PC and your Mac.
  4. If the Windows PC is running Windows XP, the Found New Hardware wizard opens. In this wizard:
    • Select Yes, this time only, and click Next.
    • Select Install the software automatically (Recommended), and click Next.
    • A Hardware Installation warning appears. Click Continue Anyway.
    • Drivers for the Parallels USB cable are installed. Click Finish to exit the wizard.
  5. On your Mac, open Parallels Desktop and choose File > New.
  6. Select Migrate from a PC and click Continue.
  7. Select Parallels USB cable and click Continue. Parallels Transporter will start collecting information about the source computer.
  8. If the Windows Installation Files window appears, insert the Windows installation disc into your Mac and click Continue.
  9. If you don’t want to log in to Windows automatically whenever you start up, select “Do not enable Automatic Logon”. Then click Continue.
  10. Choose whether you want to migrate all your files and data or only Windows applications. Then click Continue.
  11. Choose where you want to install your data. You can also click Customize and select which Windows volumes to migrate. Then click Continue.
  12. In the next step you will see a warning about Windows activation that might be required when you start using it. To proceed, read this message, select I want to continue and click Continue.
  13. Once the migration is complete, click Done.
  14. Start Windows.
  15. Once Windows starts up, choose Virtual Machine > Install Parallels Tools and follow the onscreen instructions.

Note: To be able to install Parallels Tools, you must be logged in to Windows as an administrator.

Over a network

Important: After importing your data, you may need to reactivate some of your Windows programs using the activation keys you received when you purchased the programs. To import your data from a PC over a network:

  1. Turn on your Mac and your Windows PC then log in to both. Verify sure that the computers are connected over the same network.
  2. Make sure that the Windows firewall is turned off. You can turn it on again after the import is finished.
  3. On the Windows PC, open Parallels Transporter Agent. From the Start menu select All Programs > Parallels > Parallels Transporter Agent.
  4. On your Mac, open Parallels Desktop and choose File > New.
  5. Select “Migrate from a PC” and click Continue.
  6. Select “Network” and click Continue.
  7. Find the passcode displayed in Parallels Wizard on your Mac and enter it in Parallels Transporter Agent on your Windows PC. You can also connect to the source Windows PC using its name or IP address: click “Use IP address instead”, select the Windows PC name from the list or type the IP address, and click Continue.
  8. If you have chosen to use the computer name or IP address, provide the Windows administrator credentials. Parallels Desktop will connect to Parallels Transporter Agent and start collecting information about the source computer.
  9. If the Windows Installation Files window appears, insert the Windows installation disc into your Mac and click Continue.
  10. If you don’t want to log in to Windows automatically whenever you start up, select “Do not enable Automatic Logon”. Then click Continue.
  11. Choose whether you want to migrate all your files and data or only Windows applications. Then click Continue.
  12. Choose where you want to install your data. You can also click Customize and select which Windows volumes to migrate. Then click Continue.
  13. In the next step you will see a warning about Windows activation that might be required when you start using it. To proceed, read this message, select “I want to continue” and click Continue.
  14. Once the migration is complete, click Done.
  15. Start Windows.
  16. When Windows boots up, choose Virtual Machine > Install Parallels Tools and follow the onscreen instructions.

Note: To be able to install Parallels Tools, you must be logged in to Windows as an administrator.

Using an External Storage Device

Important: After importing your data, you may need to reactivate some of your Windows programs using the activation keys you received when you purchased the programs. To import your data from a PC using an external storage device:

  1. Connect an external storage device to your Windows PC.
  2. In the Windows PC, open Parallels Transporter Agent by clicking the Start menu and selecting All Programs > Parallels > Parallels Transporter Agent.
  3. Click the external storage device icon.
  4. Click Next. Parallels Transporter Agent will collect information about the Windows PC.
  5. If you don’t want to log in to Windows automatically whenever you start up, select “Do not enable Automatic Logon”. Then click Next.
  6. Choose whether you want to migrate all your files and data or only Windows applications. Then click Next.
  7. Choose where you want to store your data. You can also click Customize and select which Windows volumes to migrate. Then click Next.
  8. In the next step you will see a warning about Windows activation that might be required when you start using it. To proceed, read this message, select “I want to continue” and click Next.
  9. Once the migration is complete, click Done to quit Parallels Transporter Agent.
  10. Disconnect the storage device from the Windows PC and connect it to your Mac.
  11. On your Mac, open Parallels Desktop and choose File > New.
  12. Select “Migrate from a PC” and click Continue.
  13. Select “External Storage Device” and click Continue.
  14. Click “Choose” and locate where you chose to store your data in step 7. Then click Continue.
  15. Choose where you want to install Windows and your data, then click Continue.
  16. Once the migration is complete, click Done.
  17. Start Windows.
  18. When Windows boots up, choose Virtual Machine > Install Parallels Tools and follow the onscreen instructions.

Note: To be able to install Parallels Tools, you must be logged in to Windows as an administrator.

For more information about migrating your PC to Mac please also visit our on-line User’s Guide

If you have an issue with migration, please follow the solution outlined in KB #113269.


Related articles:

Source: http://kb.parallels.com/eu/115007

There’s more than one way to kill a Unix process

Terminating processes on Unix systems is not quite an art, but there are sure a lot more options for how to select and terminate Unix processes than there are ways to skin a cat. In this post, we take a quick look at some of the commands and options that are likely to be the most useful.

Control sequences

The most obvious way to kill a process is probably to type Ctrl-C. This assumes, of course, that you’ve just started running it and that you’re still on the command line with the process running in the foreground. There are other control sequence options as well. You could suspend a process by using Ctrl-Z and then running a command such a kill %1 (depending on how many background processes you have running) to snuff it out.

  • Ctrl-C sends SIGINT (interrupt)
  • Ctrl-Z sends TSTP (terminal stop)
  • Ctrl-\ sends SIGQUIT (terminate and dump core)
  • Ctrl-T sends SIGINFO (show information), but this sequence is not supported on all Unix systems

Kill commands

Then, there are the various kill commands — including kill, pkill, xkill, and killall. The xkill command is a kill command for X Windows, so I won’t cover it here. The others are general purpose and provide very specific or fairly general process termination options.

kill

The kill command expects to be provided with a process ID and offers options such as -9 (often referred to as the “sure kill” option) to control what signal is sent to a running process. With the sure kill option, the kernel stops a process dead in its tracks giving it no time to execute a proper shutdown routine. Because this can result in data loss, this option should only be used when the process cannot otherwise be stopped.

$ kill -9 7911
$ kill -s 9 7911
$ kill -KILL 7911

Other commonly used kill options include:

-1 (-HUP) is the “hang up” option. This option is very safe. Most programs are built to listen for this signal and shut down in an orderly fashion if they do.

-2 (SIGINT) is the same signal that is used when you type Ctrl-C. It is generally safe, though some data loss is possible.

-15 (-TERM) is the “terminate” signal and the default. Like -1 (-HUP), it tells the process to shut down and is generally safe, though -1 (-HUP) is still the gentlest and most predictable.

You can get a complete list of the signals available to you using the kill -l(-l for “list”) command.

$ kill -l
 1) SIGHUP       2) SIGINT       3) SIGQUIT      4) SIGILL       5) SIGTRAP
 6) SIGABRT      7) SIGBUS       8) SIGFPE       9) SIGKILL     10) SIGUSR1
11) SIGSEGV     12) SIGUSR2     13) SIGPIPE     14) SIGALRM     15) SIGTERM
16) SIGSTKFLT   17) SIGCHLD     18) SIGCONT     19) SIGSTOP     20) SIGTSTP
21) SIGTTIN     22) SIGTTOU     23) SIGURG      24) SIGXCPU     25) SIGXFSZ
26) SIGVTALRM   27) SIGPROF     28) SIGWINCH    29) SIGIO       30) SIGPWR
31) SIGSYS      34) SIGRTMIN    35) SIGRTMIN+1  36) SIGRTMIN+2  37) SIGRTMIN+3
38) SIGRTMIN+4  39) SIGRTMIN+5  40) SIGRTMIN+6  41) SIGRTMIN+7  42) SIGRTMIN+8
43) SIGRTMIN+9  44) SIGRTMIN+10 45) SIGRTMIN+11 46) SIGRTMIN+12 47) SIGRTMIN+13
48) SIGRTMIN+14 49) SIGRTMIN+15 50) SIGRTMAX-14 51) SIGRTMAX-13 52) SIGRTMAX-12
53) SIGRTMAX-11 54) SIGRTMAX-10 55) SIGRTMAX-9  56) SIGRTMAX-8  57) SIGRTMAX-7
58) SIGRTMAX-6  59) SIGRTMAX-5  60) SIGRTMAX-4  61) SIGRTMAX-3  62) SIGRTMAX-2
63) SIGRTMAX-1  64) SIGRTMAX

pkill

In its simplest form, the pkill command is handed the name of a process and sends it a SIGTERM (just like the kill command). The benefit is that you do a little less work, not having to look up the process ID, and the command does a little more. Of course, if you’re trying to kill a particular process and sixteen of them are running on the system, you’ll only be able to shoot down those that belong to you — unless you’re using your superuser powers. Sometimes you want to shut down one particular process. Sometimes you want to kill by name.

If we want to terminate a looping process called “loopy”, we can do that easily:

$ pkill loopy

We also could have done it this way, but that would even be more work.

$ ps -ef | grep loopy
shs       4310  4168  0 13:52 pts/0    00:00:00 /bin/bash ./loopy
shs       4314  4168  0 13:52 pts/0    00:00:00 grep --color=auto loopy
$ kill 4310

We also have the option of using the -u (username) option to kill by username, but note that this will attempt to terminate all processes being run by this user.

# pkill -u shs

Alternately, we can kill one specific process for one specific users.

# pkill -u shs loopy

Want to log off real quick and shut down everything you’re doing?

$ pkill -u `whoami`

This will kill all processes you might have running, even those running in the background.

The pgrep and pkill commands share a man page since they, after all, are just different sides of the same executable.

Options that work only for pgrep:

  • -d delimiter between process IDs
  • -l (include username in output)

options that work only for pkill

  • -signal (specify signal to be sent)

The number of variety of signals that are available is quite mind-boggling. Under normal circumstances, however, you will probably only make use of these.

Signal Name    Signal Value  Behaviour
SIGHUP          1            Hangup
SIGKILL         9            Kill Signal
SIGTERM        15            Terminate

You can use the numeric or the more descriptive name in your kill commands — kill -9 and kill -KILL have the same effect.

But as you saw, if you read my post on pgrep, there are numerous other options available with pkill. You can specify the user, the effective userid, the terminal, the signal to be sent, the process group, just the oldest or newest instance of a process, etc.

sample commands

$ pkill -U intruder
$ pkill -U `whoami`
$ pkill -n myproc
$ pkill -f partial
# pkill -9 -P 1984
# pkill -g 123

You can also terminate a specific process by providing more information about the process you’re targeting. The -f option allows you to specify more than just the process name using a command pattern like this:

pkill -9 -f "COMMANDNAME -PARAMETERS"

killall

The killall command also provides the kill-by-name capability and, like kill and pkill, sends a SIGTERM by default. If some process seems to be replicating itself with wild abandon, you can shut it down with a command like killall repproc, killall -9 repproc, or killall -q -9 repproc. With the -q options, the command will run “quietly” and you won’t see output from the kill operation.

Options available with the killall command include:

-e exact match
-I ignore case
-g process group
-i interactive (ask for confirmation before killing)
-l list known signal names
-o older than
-q work quietly
-r interpret process name as regular expression
-s send the specified signal
-u specified user
-v verbose
-V show version
-w wait for all processes to die
-y younger than
-Z specify security context

Why signals?

Whenever you generate a signal using any form of kill command, the operating system interrupts the target process’ normal flow of execution. What happens next depends on the signal being sent.

The pkill and killall commands came about to make terminating process easier by identifying processes by name and other criteria. Going back to our “loopy” example, you could kill the process in one fell swoop, rather than looking up the process ID and then killing it. While the effect may be the same in both cases, the end result depends on whether other processes by the same name are running and whether you have sufficient access to terminate them.

What’s easiest depends on what you’re trying to do. Is your focus on one particular user, one particular process, or a wider range of users and processes? In general, using additional options allows your kill commands to be more targeted.

Source: http://www.computerworld.com/article/3174440/linux/theres-more-than-one-way-kill-a-unix-process.html

12 interesting Linux Commands that can make you laugh

1) Get a Random Quote with fortune command

One can get random quotes and funny predictions with the help of the fortune command. But you need to have fortune package  installed in your system.

To install Fortune for system based on apt or aptitude:

linuxtechi@linuxarena:~$ sudo apt-get install fortune

To install Fortune for yum based systems like CentOS / RHEL / Fedora, run the beneath command

[root@linuxtechi ~]# yum install fortune*

Once the installation is completed run fortune command. Example is shown below

linux-fortune-command-output

2) Rev Command

The “rev” command reverses any string provided to it.whenever Linux is installed is installed automatically.

[root@linuxtechi ~]# rev
LinuxTechi
ihceTxuniL
Linux Rocks
skcoR xuniL
Opensource World
dlroW ecruosnepO
LinuxMint Ultimate Desktop
potkseD etamitlU tniMxuniL

One can even create a file with a list of names and just provide the file name next to the rev command and all the names in the file will be reversed.

[root@linuxtechi ~]# rev rev.txt
ihceTxuniL
skcoR syawla xuniL
dlrow ecruosnepO fo enobkcab eht si xuniL
ihceTxuniL moob moob
[root@linuxtechi ~]#

3) Yes Command

The Yes Command will keep on displaying yourtext for n number of times, until you intervene to stop it (CTRL + C)

synatx :

# yes <yourtext>

Example

[root@linuxtechi ~]# yes LinuxTechi.com
LinuxTechi.com
LinuxTechi.com
LinuxTechi.com
LinuxTechi.com
LinuxTechi.com
LinuxTechi.com
LinuxTechi.com
LinuxTechi.com
LinuxTechi.com^C
[root@linuxtechi ~]#

4) Turn Your Terminal into an Aquarium

Do you know that you can transform your linux system terminal into a beautiful sea aquarium with fishes and sea weeds? For that you need to install the term animator package, libcurses and  asciiaquarium package into your system.

To run the below steps successfully just make sure on your system ‘perl‘, ‘perl-Curses‘ and  ‘perl-devel‘ packages are installed

For yum based systems :

[root@linuxtechi ~]# yum install perl perl-devel perl-Curses

For Debian based systems

linuxtechi@linuxarena:~$ sudo apt-get install perl libcurses-perl

Follow the below steps to install and run this amazing Linux command:

First, make sure you’ve downloaded the term animator package

[root@linuxtechi ~]# wget http://search.cpan.org/CPAN/authors/id/K/KB/KBAUCOM/Term-Animation-2.6.tar.gz

Install the package using below steps

[root@linuxtechi ~]# tar zxpvf Term-Animation-2.6.tar.gz
[root@linuxtechi ~]# cd Term-Animation-2.6
[root@linuxtechi Term-Animation-2.6]# perl Makefile.PL && make && make test
[root@linuxtechi Term-Animation-2.6]# make install

Note: In Case you are facing any issues while executing above steps then  we can  use cpan console to install “Term Animation” Package as shown below

cpan[1]> install Term::Animation

Finally download and install the asciiaquarium package using below steps:

[root@linuxtechi ~]# wget http://www.robobunny.com/projects/asciiquarium/asciiquarium.tar.gz
[root@linuxtechi ~]# tar zxpvf asciiquarium.tar.gz
[root@linuxtechi ~]# cd asciiquarium_1.1/
[root@linuxtechi asciiquarium_1.1]# cp asciiquarium /usr/local/bin/
[root@linuxtechi asciiquarium_1.1]# chmod 755 /usr/local/bin/asciiquarium

Now run the command

[root@linuxtechi ~]# /usr/local/bin/asciiquarium

or

[root@linuxtechi ~]# asciiquarium

Linnux-Terminal-Asciiquarium

5) Toilet Command

As the name suggests, the functionality of this command is entirely different and don’t know why they named as toilet for this command. This command outputs large sized beautiful banners entirely built using small characters.

For Debian Based systems use below command to install toilet package

linuxtechi@linuxarena:~$ sudo apt-get install toilet

For stems like CentOS and RHEL use below commands to install toilet

[root@linuxtechi ~]# wget http://caca.zoy.org/raw-attachment/wiki/toilet/toilet-0.3.tar.gz
[root@linuxtechi ~]# tar zxpvf toilet-0.3.tar.gz
[root@linuxtechi ~]# cd toilet-0.3
[root@linuxtechi toilet-0.3]# ./configure && make && make install

Example:

linuxtechi@linuxarena:~$ toilet LinuxTechi Rocks

Toilet-Linux-Command-Output

Toilet command offers wide range of options like fonts, colorful characters and filters. Use the man page of toilet command to explore all these options.

Linux-toilet-command-output2

6) Set Your Terminal on Fire

Want to set your terminal on fire, don’t panic, it’s just some funny command that outputs fire like output using characters.

Install the package which provides aafire command on Debian like systems.

linuxtechi@linuxarena:~$ sudo apt-get install libaa-bin
linuxtechi@linuxarena:~$ aafire

Fire-on-linux-terminal

7) Ask a Cow to Repeat What You Say

cowsay” is another funny Linux command that displays your text input by a cow or any other animal of your choice

linuxtechi@linuxarena:~$ sudo apt-get install cowsay
linuxtechi@linuxarena:~$ cowsay Linux world Rocks

Linux-command-cowsay-output

cowsay command can also be used with fortune command, example is shown below :

linuxtechi@linuxarena:~$ fortune | cowsay

cowsay-with-fortune-command-output

8) Enter the World of Matrix

Relive the matrix experience with the help of cmatrix command.

cmatrix command is not available in the default OS installation, use the below command to install cmatrix package for Debian Based systems

linuxtechi@linuxarena:~$ sudo apt-get install cmatrix

Run the beneath command to start the matrix

linuxtechi@linuxarena:~$ cmatrix

cmatrix-linux-command-output

9) Do You Love that Jerry Mouse

Are you getting bored with the same old black mouse pointer and want to have some fun with that. “Oneko” package comes to the rescue, which attaches “Jerry” the famed mouse to your mouse pointer and you can see that little cute mouse run along with your pointer. Pretty much Fun isn’t it ?

Install oneko package using below command on debian like systems

linuxtechi@linuxarena:~$ sudo apt-get install oneko

Once the installation is finished type the command “oneko”

linux-oneko-command-output

10) Turn Your Terminal to Speak To You

Turn your speakers on as you can make your Linux terminal speak to you with the espeak command. Let’s first install epseak package

For Debian based systems

linuxtechi@linuxarena:~$ sudo apt-get install espeak

For yum based systems

[root@linuxtechi ~]# yum install espeak

Execute the espeak command followed by the text

linuxtechi@linuxarena:~$ espeak "LinuxTechi is the best Website for Linux guide and tutorials"

11)  Steam Locomotive in your Linux Terminal

You all know about the “ls” command used for displaying all the files in a folder, but do you know about “sl” ? It is a funny linux command that draws an ASCII steam locomotive in your Linux terminal screen.

‘sl’ command is not available by default, so let’s  first install it.

For Debian based systems

linuxtechi@linuxarena:~$ sudo apt-get install sl

for Yum based systems

[root@linuxtechi ~]# yum install sl

Run the ‘sl’ command and view the output

[root@linuxtechi ~]# sl

linux-sl-command-Steam-Locomotive

12) Watch Star Wars

Want to go back to your school days where you are dumbstruck with the characters of star wars, but you can’t see the movie here, but just see how Star wars text printed in ASCII characters.

[root@linuxtechi ~]# telnet towel.blinkenlights.nl

Wait for Couple of seconds , it will print Star wars text in ASCII format.

startwars-20th-century-output

After couple of seconds , it will show below

starwars-longway-message-linux-terminal

starwars-Ascii-characters-linux-terminal

starwards-episode-linux-terminal

starwars-message-linux-terminal

To Stop or terminate starwars , simply press ctrl+] and after that telnet terminal will come and type quit there

That’s all from this article, I hope you guys have enjoyed these funny commands and if you feel any other command that should be included in this list, Please do let us know us.

Source: https://www.linuxtechi.com/12-interesting-linux-commands-make-you-laugh/