SWITCH2OSM

https://switch2osm.org/

OpenStreetMap won’t charge you

OpenStreetMap is open data. We won’t charge for it – ever. Our licence says that you can always copy our data for free.

This data is made into the “map tiles” that you show on your site. You can do this yourself. Or you can find a specialist to do it: some will charge for this, some won’t. But OpenStreetMap itself will never charge you for the data.

Make the maps suit you

With other map providers, the map looks how the provider wants it to look. You might be able to do a bit of rudimentary recolouring. But it’s still their style of map, not yours.

With OpenStreetMap, you’re in control. Turning the data into tiles can be done any way you like. Want to emphasise cycle routes and play down motorways? No problem. (Most other maps don’t even have cycle routes.) Want to label subway stops but ignore bus stops? Easy.

Rich, accurate, up-to-date map data

Most commercial providers just do streets. OpenStreetMap might have “street” in the name, but we do much more. Natural features, bus routes, footpaths and cycleways, administrative boundaries, shops, rivers and canals… you name it.

Commercial providers also only update their data every month, if you’re lucky. New roads and buildings can be missing from their datasets long after they’ve opened. OpenStreetMap data is constantly updated, and you can get those updates every day, every hour or even every minute if you want.

All this is contributed by our volunteers (over 1,000,000 signed up so far, and growing every day) – the people who really know about their area. That’s why OpenStreetMap often shows new developments before any commercial provider.

It’s easier than you think

There’s no limit to what you can do with OpenStreetMap. Yet it needn’t take long to get started. You can switch to OSM in under an hour using tools like the easy Leaflet API. Read the rest of this site to get started with the possibilities.

 

MAKE THE SWITCH TO OPENSTREETMAP

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Why can’t I access forwarded ports on my WAN IP from my LAN/OPTx networks?

By default, pfSense does not allow LAN/OPTx connected PCs to reach forwarded ports on the WAN interface. This is a technical limitation of how the underlying PF functions, it cannot « reflect » in and out the same Interface; it only works when passing « through » the router. NAT Reflection employs some simple bouncing daemons to redirect the connections, which works but isn’t always desirable, or even functional for some scenarios. Usually, split DNS is the better way if it is possible on your network. Both are explained here.

Method 1: NAT Reflection

In order to access ports forwarded on your WAN interface from internal networks, you need to enable NAT reflection.

In order to do this, you must go to System > Advanced, and from there uncheck « Disable NAT Reflection ». Click save, and it should work. This will only work with single port forwards or ranges of less than 500 ports. If you’re using 1:1 NAT, you can’t use NAT Reflection.

Example of system with NAT Reflection enabled. (Disable choice is unchecked).

Method 2: Split DNS

The more elegant solution to this problem involves using Split DNS. Basically this means that internal and external clients resolve your hostnames differently.

Your internal clients would access your resources by hostname, not IP, and clients on your local network would resolve that hostname to your LAN IP, and not the WAN IP as others outside your network would see.

In order for this to work using the DNS forwarder in pfSense, your clients will need to have the IP Address of the pfSense router as their primary DNS server.

Example:

Some screenshots that show the above in practice:

Split DNS Example, adding DNS Override

Split DNS Example, what your screen should look like with http://www.example.com overridden as 192.168.1.5

 

Method 3: Experimental Routing Tricks

This should be considered experimental, and could possibly cause bad things to happen!

If you’re using 1:1 NAT, you can’t use NAT Reflection. If you’re a service provider (a web host, say), you may not have all relevant DNS entries under your control, so « Method 2: Split DNS » may be difficult to implement.

If you have a CIDR network block allocated to you which is all behind your pfSense firewall, you might be better off using public addresses on your internal network, or using a mix of public and private addresses.

If you have only a portion of your CIDR block behind pfSense, and you’re using 1:1 NAT, you may have a difficult situation. Here’s a possible approach you can consider. This may not work, or may work in only some situations. Be careful: don’t try this if you’re remote or don’t have console access to your devices.

1. Make the external IP address an alias on your loopback interface (the interface with localhost/127.0.0.1 on it). In FreeBSD, that’s something like this on the command line:

Used in <shellcmd> tags in pfSense, as described here.

2. Cause every other internal host to route traffic destined to your external IP to your internal IP. There may be 3 ways to do this:

a) Add a static route on every other host with something like route add -host 1.2.3.4 10.0.0.4 but you have to run that on every other host. This option can quickly become administratively difficult as the number of internal hosts goes up, but this can be mitigated if you have centralized administration (via something like cfagent, say).

b) Run a routing protocol – routed for example – on your internal network, and publish routes reflecting the external/internal 1:1 NAT mapping. This might be the most complicated choice, but might scale better than the other alternatives.

c) This seems to not work, presumably because pfSense already knows a route to the external network: Add static routes on the LAN interface of your pfSense firewall with a destination of the external address (1.2.3.4/32) and a gateway of the internal address (10.0.0.4/32). This alternative worries me a little bit, as I’m afraid it might confuse the firewall – I don’t think so, but please be careful.

Source: http://dablog.informafix.net/204

The 10 Best Free and Open Source CRM Software Solutions

There’s no such thing as a free lunch. It’s one of the saddest facts in my life, right up there with my insane student debt and the realization that Taylor Swift will probably never talk to me.

But there’s good news! I just saved a bunch of money by switching to… no, I’m kidding.

The real good news is that, while lunch may not be free, Customer Relationship Management software can be!

Free stuff is exciting!

Free CRM comes in two categories – free, but limited (also known as freemium), and open source.

So the free, but limited, versions set caps on the amount of free users, contacts, storage, extra features, or some combination thereof.

Open source, on the other hand, offers an unlimited, fully functional CRM to users. The caveat is that your company needs a person (or team) who can install and configure the CRM. Of course, because of this, open source CRM is extremely customizable, which is nice. Most open source CRM companies also offer a preconfigured version and/or installation and support for a price.

Where can you find these magical free CRMs? Well, I put together a list for you! Check out the comparison chart below and read the details about the CRM systems that interest you.

Please note that I have not placed these in any particular order. Each system is different and each one will serve some companies better than others.

1. SuiteCRM

SuiteCRM

SuiteCRM is an open source alternative to SugarCRM and is actually based on Sugar’s open source version. Sugar’s open source product is extremely stripped down, and as one reviewer put it “SuiteCRM is the best of all worlds. It’s based on Open Source Sugar, but uses Open Source add-ons to make it close to, if not better than, the ‘Pay’ Sugar.”

Suite offers a preconfigured version for those users who don’t have the ability to install/configure in house. The upgrade fee for that is £10 or roughly $16.40 a month.

2. CapsuleCRM

Capsule is free for up to two users with 10 MB of storage, and 250 contacts. To upgrade, it’s $12/user/month. With the upgrade comes two gigabytes of storage, 50,000 contacts, and integration with such applications as Mailchimp andFreshbooks.

Capsule’s best feature, according to its many glowing reviews, is its ability to integrate with at least 33 other software programs, including Mailchimp, Freshbooks, and Gmail.

In fact, according to the reviews, the only place Capsule is really lacking as a system is its customer support. While they have a FAQs section as well as helpful articles posted on their page, if you need any help after hours, you’re sunk. In addition, they offer no direct phone service. Rather, you must submit a form, though they do claim to call you back within a single business day.

3. Insightly

insightly

Insightly claims on its homepage to be the “#1 online small business CRM.” I have no evidence to corroborate this particular claim, but I can tell you that they offer a great free program and a very friendly website.

Insightly offers their system free for two users, 2,500 records (which they define as any stored item from contact to note), 200 megabytes of storage and ten custom fields. New features on the freemium level include advanced reporting and 10 emails a day. The upgrade fee is $12/user/month and includes 25,000 records, and 1 gigabyte of storage.

The feature that really sets Insightly apart from other CRMs is it’s built-in email marketing system. The freemium level has very limited access to the email marketing system, which is not likely to be a problem because a business that small probably won’t have the bandwidth for email marketing tasks. However, when your business expands, Insightly will save you money because you won’t need to spend extra on a second system for your emails.

As they say on their homepage, Insightly is great for small businesses. For many small businesses two users is really more than enough. However, many reviewershave mentioned that Insightly is not ideal for bigger businesses, particularly because its functionality is not capable of handling the demands of a larger business. One particular example cited is that the email integration lacks a lot of user functionality that other CRM platforms don’t think twice about. It should also be mentioned that Insightly only offers support via the online community.

4. Really Simple Systems

Really Simple Systems claims to be the best CRM system for small businesses. (But it does not claim to be the #1 online CRM for small business, so there’s no rivalry with Insightly.)

Really Simple Systems offers a free two user system that includes 100 accounts (business that you deal with), unlimited contacts within those accounts, tasks, and 100MB of storage, along with free full customer support. When you’re ready to upgrade, Really Simple Systems has very flexible pricing. If you choose to forego certain features, you can get the pricing as low as $8/user/month.

Customers love Really Simple Systems because it’s actually really simple and they offer excellent customer support. I honestly struggled to find the problems people had with this system, that’s how much users love it.

However, I did manage to dig up one con to keep in mind. Cloudpro’s review, while generally praising this CRM, does mention that Really Simple Systems offers more limited functionality, and so works best for small businesses compared to large or enterprise ones.

5. FreeCRM

Here’s another CRM that claims to be #1 at something. This time its #1 at online free CRM software for business (so again, technically no rivalry!).

This free version comes with 100 free users, 100,00 contacts, and all the basic features. The upgrade fee is $24.95/user/month for more features, storage, and support. Two major drawbacks up front: you only get one year free, and no customer support.

So what makes FreeCRM worth it? First, their upgraded system is actually one of the most affordable CRMs on the market for mid to large sized businesses. Second, it’s a web-based solution, so you don’t need to create an expensive and time-consuming infrastructure to host it on, meaning pretty much anyone can get it up and running with ease.

6. Bitrix24

Bitrix24

I like Bitrix a lot because it offers really flexible price options. I like flexibility. For a completely free account you get 12 users, five GB of storage and the ability to do anything you want with that storage, which is already a pretty sweet deal.

This is how it gets better. The upgrade fee to get unlimited users and 50 gigs of storage is $99, but if you’re not feeling that cause really all you needed was a few more users, or maybe just more storage… Bitrix totally hears you! They offer an additional 12 users to the same program for $25/user/month. And/or if you want more storage they offer a tiered pricing plan on that up to one TB.

If you’re looking for an installed CRM, Bitrix can do that for you as well (although it’s not free). For a one-time fee of $4990, you can get their small-business installed CRM (good for up to 25 users).

So that’s the pricing.

Overall, reviewers find Bitrix to be a very easy-to-use system. In addition, itsdocument management feature is well integrated and extremely useful. What makes Bitrix really stand out above the crowd is just how feature-rich it is. Check out this (very abbreviated) list of all the things the free version comes with:

  • Project management features such as: tasking, gantt charts, and time tracking. (In fact, Bitrix is actually one of our favorite free project management software solutions.)
  • Built-in email marketing
  • Telephony features such as: call-recording, and dial-out from within the CRM.
  • Sales automation
  • Sales funnel + reporting
  • Invoicing
  • Sales team management

The drawback that reviewers all point out is that Bitrix’ aesthetics are a little rough at points. One reviewer mentioned that they use a flashing clock in the corner to remind users to timestamp all activities, which I could easily imagine is quite obnoxious.

7. Raynet

Raynet markets itself as an easy-to-use, does-it-all CRM. It’s free version allows for two users, 150 accounts, 50MB of storage, and full customer support. Upgrade to 20,000 accounts and one TB of storage for just $19/user/month.

Raynet’s system is very aesthetically pleasing and features an “account card” (featured above) where you can glean most of the information you need about a customer from a single glance, including how much they’re worth to your company.

All that said, Raynet is a fairly new company, and the fact that it’s headquartered in the Czech Republic may make support difficult for U.S.-based companies (though they have an office in Florida).  Additionally, perhaps because it’s such a recent entrant to the American CRM market, there is not yet much third party information or reviews on software.

8. vTiger

vTiger

vTiger is an open source CRM, that is also based on Sugar. vTiger was actually originally a part of Sugar, but both have since gone their own ways.

While you can download and install the open source version of the software for free yourself, vTiger does offer several preconfigured versions starting as just $12/user/month. In addition, vTiger also offers installation, support, hardware, and/or administration for a price. This paid version integrates with MailChimp,Intuit and Paypal, among others.

One thing that vTiger does really well is offer a wide array of features for very cheap, even on the preconfigured level. These features include billing, inventory tracking, and project management capabilities, all of which are fairly unusual to find in any CRM system.

From reviews, it would appear as though a fairly important drawback to vTiger is the fact that it has compatibility issues with PHP 5.6 and above.

9. ZohoCRM

Zoho

Zoho is one of the big dogs of business software, so it’s pretty cool that they offer a free program. This CRM version is free for 10 users and 5,000 records. It comes with a mobile app and social CRM among other things. Their first step upgrade (for more users, features, and 100,000 records) is only $12/user/month.

Zoho is well known for being easy to use with highly developed importing features.

Unfortunately, Zoho is not as feature-rich as other CRMs on this list and has some quirks that take getting used to. An example that one reviewer used was that, when exporting from Zoho, you have to be very careful to ensure that there are no commas in any records, or else it will split up the record when putting it into Excel.

10. Zurmo

Zurmo is open source, and is unique on this list because it is also gamified. Zurmo was written on the principal that offering users incentives along the way makes users better employees. So the system sets goals, or ‘missions’ (which are different for different types of users) and then gives badges along the way to goal completion. It also allows coworkers to challenge each other to missions with set rewards at the end (like a gift card).

Currently, the biggest drawback to Zurmo is that it’s pretty new on the scene – which, being open source, can actually be a bit of a bother. Zurmo’s open source version lacks some fairly basic features such as social CRM.  This, of course, is unlikely to remain a problem the longer it sticks around.

Zurmo’s preconfigured version has now been spun off as it’s own cloud-based, gamified CRM system called CRM.me. The upgrade fee starts at $35/user/month.

11. Hubspot CRM

free crm

At the time that I originally wrote this article, I mentioned that Hubspot was coming out with a free CRM. Well, they finally have come out with their CRM so let’s talk about it.

It’s a 100% free CRM. They have a few “Sidekick” features, like click-to-call that you do have to pay for if you want them, but this is not a product Hubspot is interested in making much money off of. Why? Because Hubspot’s main product is their phenomenal marketing automation solution and this CRM is intended to be a gateway system to using Hubspot’s marketing automation software.

Having said that, let’s talk about what makes Hubspot’s CRM worth looking at. For starters, being designed by marketing automation specialists with the purpose of eventually convincing users to start using their marketing automation software, Hubspot’s CRM has some amazing data gathering abilities. Traditionally, all the data in a CRM must be entered by a salesperson. That’s slowly changing, but Hubspot really jumped in. They’ve got a leg up on the competition because they long ago figured out how to pull data about people from their internet doings and email engagement rates among other things. All those abilities are put to good use in their CRM, the point being, of course, to make their CRM an intuitive part of their marketing automation software. As a result, though, Hubspot’s data tracking features are head-and-shoulders above the competition.

It’s important to keep in mind that Hubspot’s CRM is extremely lightweight. It is really only an option for small to midsize businesses that have never used a CRM before. Of course, the solution is brand new on the market. There may come a day when this free CRM can compete swing for swing against a solution like Salesforce(who also has a companion marketing automation solution).

12. InStream

InStream is a fairly new CRM, but it’s great for small businesses. It’s free for 2 users, and includes unlimited lists, social integrations, and basic integrations. InStream’s upgrade price is roughly $11.36/user/month (it’s £8/user/month).

One feature that makes InStream great for small businesses is its suggestion feature. InStream is able to provide in-app suggestions on how to continue working on a prospect, which is a pretty cool feature for a sales team just learning the ropes.

InStream is so new that it’s still a very lightweight CRM, which makes it ideal for small businesses, but difficult to use for larger businesses.

13. High Rise

High Rise makes CRM simple for small businesses. Their free CRM level gives you 2 users and 250 contacts. Upgrade to 6 users and 5000 contacts for $24/month (which works out to about $4/user/month!).

High Rise is a lean, mean, contact-managing machine – what I mean by that is that it gives a small business everything they need to sell, without cluttering up their dashboards with anything unnecessary. High Rise also integrates with many other software products that are popular amongst small businesses (like MailChimp andZendesk), making it really easy to supplement any current strategies you’re using.

Reviewers like High Rise because of its “simplistic and affordable” nature, though, predictably, they mention disliking the lack of features.

Honorable Mentions

So that’s my round up. CRM, though, is a category that’s very rich in free and open source programs. Some others to check out include Sugar CRM, Splendid CRM,OpenCRX, EspoCRM, and Xtuple.

Finally, there are a whole host of cheap and affordable CRM options you should be considering that, even though not free, may be the perfect fit for your organization.

Are there any other great free and open source CRM programs out there that I missed? Put them in the comments below!

If you’re still wondering if you even need a CRM, check out my post explaining what CRM is and what it can do for you here.

 

Source: http://blog.capterra.com/free-and-open-source-crm/

How to Use Slmgr to Change, Remove, or Extend Your Windows License

Windows activation is designed to be as foolproof as possible, so Microsoft’s graphical tools keep it simple. If you want to do something more advanced like remove a product key, force an online activation, or extend the activation timer, you’ll need Slmgr.vbs.

This command line tool is included with Windows, and provides options unavailable in the standard activation interface provided on the Update & Security > Activation screen in the Settings app.

First: Open an Administrator Command Prompt Window

To use this tool, you’ll want to launch a Command Prompt with Administrator access. To do so on Windows 8 or 10, either right-click the Start button or press Windows+X. Click the “Command Prompt (Admin)” option in the menu that appears. On Windows 7, search the Start menu for “Command Prompt,” right-click it, and select “Run as Administrator.”

View Activation, License, and Expiration Date Information

To display very basic license and activation information about the current system, run the following command. This command tells you the edition of Windows, part of the product key so you can identify it, and whether the system is activated.

slmgr.vbs /dli

To display more detailed license information–including the activation ID, installation ID, and other details–run the following command:

slmgr.vbs /dlv

View the License Expiration Date

To display the expiration date of the current license, run the following command. This is only useful for Windows system activated from an organization’s KMS server, as retail licenses and multiple activation keys result in a perpetual license that won’t expire. If you haven’t provided a product key at all, it’ll give you an error message.

slmgr.vbs /xpr

Uninstall the Product Key

You can remove the product key from your current Windows system with Slmgr. After you run the below command and restart your computer, the Windows system won’t have a product key and will be in an unactivated, unlicensed state.

If you installed Windows from a retail license and would like to use that license on another computer, this allows you to remove the license. It could also be useful if you’re giving that computer away to someone else. However, most Windows licenses are tied to the computer they came with–unless you purchased a boxed copy.

To remove uninstall the current product key, run the following command and then restart your computer:

slmgr.vbs /upk

Windows also stores the product key in the registry, as it’s sometimes necessary for the key to be in the registry when setting up the computer. If you’ve uninstalled the product key, you should run the below command to ensure it’s removed from the registry as well. This will ensure people who use the computer in the future can’t grab the product key.

Running this command alone won’t uninstall your product key. It’ll remove it from the registry so programs can’t access it from there, but your Windows system will remain licensed unless you run the above command to actually uninstall the product key. This option is really designed to prevent the key from being stolen by malware, if malware running on the current system gains access to the registry.

slmgr.vbs /cpky

Set or Change the Product Key

You can use slmgr.vbs to enter a new product key. If the Windows system already has a product key, using the below command will silently replace the old product key with the one you provide.

Run the following command to replace the product key, replacing #####-#####-#####-#####-##### with the product key. The command will check the product key you enter to ensure it’s valid before using it. Microsoft advises you restart the computer after running this command.

You can also change your product key from the Activation screen in the Settings app, but this command lets you do it from the command line.

slmgr.vbs /ipk #####-#####-#####-#####-#####

Activate Windows Online

To force Windows to attempt an online activation, run the following command. If you’re using a retail edition of Windows, this will force Windows to attempt online activation with Microsoft’s servers. If the system is set up to use a KMS activation server, it will instead attempt activation with the KMS server on the local network. This command can be useful if Windows didn’t activate due to a connection or server problem and you want to force it to retry.

slmgr.vbs /ato

Activate Windows Offline

Slmgr also allows you to perform an offline activation. To get an installation ID for offline activation, run the following command:

slmgr.vbs /dti

You’ll now need to get a a confirmation ID you can use to activate the system over the phone. Call the Microsoft Product Activation Center, provide the installation ID you received above, and you’ll be given an activation ID if everything checks out. This allows you to activate Windows systems without Internet connections.

To enter the confirmation ID you’ve received for offline activation, run the following command. Replace “ACTIVATIONID” with the activation ID you’ve received.

slmgr.vbs /atp ACTIVATIONID

Once you’re done, you can use the slmgr.vbs /dli or slmgr.vbs /dlv commands to confirm you’re activated.

This can generally be done from the Activation screen in the Settings app if your PC isn’t activated–you don’t have to use the command if you’d rather use the graphical interface.

Extend the Activation Timer

Some Windows systems provide a limited time where you can use them as free trials before entering a product key. For example, Windows 7 offers a 30-day trial period before it begins complaining at you. To extend this trial period and reset it back to 30 days remaining, you can use the following command.As Microsoft’s documentation puts it, this command “resets the activation timers.”

This command can only be used several times, so you can’t indefinitely extend the trial. The number of time it can be used depends on the “rearm count,” which you can view using theslmgr.vbs /dlv command. It seems different on different versions of Windows–it was three times on Windows 7, and it seems to be five times on Windows Server 2008 R2.

This no longer seems to work on Windows 10, which is very lenient if you don’t provide it a product key anyway. This option still works on older versions of Windows and may continue to work on other editions of Windows, such as Windows Server, in the future.

slmgr.vbs /rearm

Slmgr.vbs Can Perform Actions on Remote Computers, Too

Slmgr normally performs the actions you specify on the current computer. However, you can also remotely administer computers on your network if you have access to them. For example, the first command below applies to the current computer, while the second one will be run on a remote computer. You’ll just need the computer’s name, username, and password.

slmgr.vbs /option
slmgr.vbs computername username password /option

The Slmgr.vbs command has other options, which are useful for dealing with KMS activation and token-based activation. Consult Microsoft’s Slmgr.vbs documentation for more details.

Source: http://www.howtogeek.com/245445/how-to-use-slmgr-to-change-remove-or-extend-your-windows-license/